The last couple of weeks have been pretty busy, but I still managed to work on my costume. I went to my mentors place last week to cut out the patterns, and Lauren actually has a studio where she works on her costumes in her basement- it’s kind of amazing. She also gave me some notions and a jar of Gesso, which is a product used for prepping canvas for painting. Someone discovered that it sands really well, so now cosplayers commonly use it for prop finishes, as paint sticks well to it. She also gave me a wig cap for my wig that actually just came in two days ago, which was super exciting!

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New wig!

I also got a chance to ask some more detailed questions on the areas I was slightly confused about, such as where to buy Gesso, how well it sands, and on average how many layers of it are needed (answer: a lot). Through talking with my mentor I learned that an art store called Deserres sells Gesso (and most other things it seems) cheaper than Micheal, but the nearest store is Surrey or Downtown Vancouver, which is a little bit out of my way… I think I’ll stick to Micheals. Luckily I made a friend in my Textiles 11 class who actually works at Micheals, and has offered to give me discounts if I come by the store while she’s working!

Some new information I received was how to make details on the arm guards. Since EVA foam is a bit thick, I was wondering how to create subtle designs on top of the foam. Turns out that crafting foam- which is what those kids foam stickers are made of- is the way to go. It’s thinner than EVA foam, so it can be used for small details, and it’s super cheap.

One explanation I asked for is how to sew stretch fabric, something I’ll be starting to do as soon as I get my fabric cut out. Lauren’s sewed stretch fabrics before so she was able to get out some stretch fabric and demonstrate the technique on her sewing machine- turns out one actually has to stretch the fabric while guiding it through the machine, so I’ll probably want to practice on some scrap fabric before starting to sew the actual pattern together.